Bordesley Abbey application

DSC01471So, funny story time. For one of my masters modules I had to propose an interactive museum application for a museum of my choice. I chose Bordesley Abbey, arguably the most historically significant place in my hometown of Redditch.

I designed it so people could download an application and go round the abbey scanning the builders marks to learn more. It would have interactive games and it would be a lot of fun. Little did I know when I was theoretically pitching my application in my masters module, AP Interactive had already made the app and launched it just after I handed in my pitch. It was kind of spooky to be honest!

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MD Series: Premiere of the first soundscape

So, after months of work and refining, I can finally let you all hear the first soundscape that I’ve been working on. It’s called imaginatively ‘A Walk to King’s Manor’.┬áThis soundscape is made up of ambient sounds to take you back to a day at King’s Manor, York, UK in the 1850s.

In the 1850s, for those new to the project, the King’s Manor was inhabited by the Wilberforce Memorial School for the Blind. This school aimed to teach the kids not only basic lessons such as maths and English, but also ways of supporting themselves from basket making to playing a variety of musical instruments.

I hope to put all this across as you take a virtual, audio journey to the King’s Manor building. So, without further ado, take a listen on the player below:

 

MD Series: The Importance of Music

Music is a very important tool for setting the tone of a piece. It changes how the audience views a piece, how it makes them feel and how they feel the characters are meant to feel in a scene.

You only have to look at this famous clip of Star Wars without music to see how important music is to a scene:

Do you feel how awkward that is? Well, it’s no different when you’re putting together a soundscape. Particularly ones that centre a lot around music.

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MD Series: How to talk like a Victorian

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Possibly the biggest challenge with this Soundscape is how to write the script so it both reflects the language that the Victorians spoke but is also understandable for you and I today. Saying something was “well cool!” is a phrase that would be as foreign to the Victorians as the invention of the internet. So, how am I going to do it? More research!

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MD Series: Chasing historic records

Today we take social media for granted. Generally, somewhere a person has left a digital trail so you can see how your classmate from first school is doing now and vise versa. But, in the 1850s social media didn’t exist. Heck, the internet wasn’t even a pipe dream. You only have to watch a few episodes of ‘Who Do You Think You Are‘ to see how easy it is for people to disappear, re-marry, emigrate, change their name etc. So, how am I going to trace one person through the historic records to find her?

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Tributaries application

The Tributaries application is an Augmented Reality mobile/tablet application created in collaboration between Tyne and Wear Museums and Archives and sound artist and musician, Halsey Burgund. It aimed, through using historic documents from personal diaries to shipping reports to tell the stories of the people of Newcastle in the First World War both from a home front and front-line perspectives.

Earlier in the year I was lucky enough on my masters course to travel to Newcastle and test this application for myself. It promised to be personal, thought provoking and really grounded in the community. This is what I found when using the application.

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MD Series: The Wilberforce Memorial School for the Blind, York, UK

So, I realise somewhat belatedly that I haven’t fully introduced you all to the subject of my soundscape (though it was mentioned briefly in the first post of the series). Without further ado, I’ll give you a brief history of the Wilberforce Memorial School for the Blind.

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Photographs showing sections of the front part of King’s Manor

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