Masters Dissertation: introducing the series

18121795_10154969105030041_7164277915398506289_o

Where have I been hiding?

Hi all, sorry it’s been such a long time since the last post! They really don’t exaggerate when they say that a Master’s course takes the majority of your waking hours! But, I’m back with a new series of posts, this time focused on my new dissertation. The topic: Presenting information about the Wilberforce Memorial School for the Blind (that was based at King’s Manor), in the format of a soundscape.

Continue reading

Battle of Bannockburn revisited

Now, if you’ve been reading my blog for a while, then you’ll know I’ve talked about the Battle of Bannockburn Experience before. But, since that article I’ve found this really interesting video showing how the entire experience was put together.

Continue reading

Pokemon Go

ratata.png

Screenshot of a Ratata at Coughton Court (National Trust)

Now, unless you’ve been living under a rather large rock all summer it’s unlikely to have escaped your attention the sheer number of people playing Pokemon Go. Now, whether you’ve played it yourself (I think it’s rather awesome!), or know someone else who does, it’s unlikely you haven’t at least heard the name. But, what I wanted to talk about was how this app could both be utilised and analysed for the heritage sector.

How can the heritage sector embrace Pokemon Go?

Continue reading

The Battle of Bannockburn Experience

The Battle of Bannockburn Experience is a fully Augmented Reality experience created by Bright White Limited for the National Trust.

DSC_0120.JPG

 

The problem faced by the National Trust was how do you make a battle come to life when the site, before the experience was added, was essentially a flat field. How do you make the experience tangible? This is where the Battle of Bannockburn Experience was born.

Continue reading

AR and VR- talking about the differences

This video, perhaps a little long, is an interesting chat to a couple of developers of the company ARTIFACT based in York. This video presents some interesting views about the differences between AR and VR. But also at the rate at which this kind of technology is improving.

I feel this kind of video, and indeed company, shows the rate at which this kind of technology is improving and the thought processes needed in order to maintain relevance in this field.

Let me know what you think. As always, I’ll look forward to hearing your input.

Back to the Future: The Sensorama

sensorama

The Sensorama. Patented by Morton Heilig 1961

The year is 1961 and Morton Heilig has just patented his amazing invention. With the birth of the Sensorama arguably came the birth of Augmented Reality.

So, what did the Sensorama do?

The Sensorama aimed to try and create a fully immersive viewing experience. The film was three-dimensional and in colour for a start (a thing we probably take for granted these days). But, that’s not really the interesting part. The interesting part was the way it gave viewers the feeling of motion, sounds, smells and the feeling of wind on one’s face. Pretty impressive by even today’s standards.

Why was it important?

This kind of invention showed just how revolutionary Augmented Reality could be. It really was ahead of its time, even if the quality of the film wasn’t HD!

Samsung Galaxy VR

Now, I’ve talked briefly about the Samsung Gear VR before in a previous post (‘Not strictly AR gear’). But, I sumbled across this video which I think gives a better perspective of how this type of technology does function in the real world.

The video shows how the Samsung Gear VR could be used in everyday situations and highlights some interesting points such as the vulnerability that it puts the user in. I mean, if I was playing with this on a train platform I think I would be scared of having my bag snatched or just missing the train because I wasn’t aware of it arriving. It would be like reading a book but way more extreme.

Continue reading