Bordesley Abbey application

DSC01471So, funny story time. For one of my masters modules I had to propose an interactive museum application for a museum of my choice. I chose Bordesley Abbey, arguably the most historically significant place in my hometown of Redditch.

I designed it so people could download an application and go round the abbey scanning the builders marks to learn more. It would have interactive games and it would be a lot of fun. Little did I know when I was theoretically pitching my application in my masters module, AP Interactive had already made the app and launched it just after I handed in my pitch. It was kind of spooky to be honest!

Continue reading

Advertisements

MD Series: The Importance of Music

Music is a very important tool for setting the tone of a piece. It changes how the audience views a piece, how it makes them feel and how they feel the characters are meant to feel in a scene.

You only have to look at this famous clip of Star Wars without music to see how important music is to a scene:

Do you feel how awkward that is? Well, it’s no different when you’re putting together a soundscape. Particularly ones that centre a lot around music.

Continue reading

Battle of Bannockburn revisited

Now, if you’ve been reading my blog for a while, then you’ll know I’ve talked about the Battle of Bannockburn Experience before. But, since that article I’ve found this really interesting video showing how the entire experience was put together.

Continue reading

The Battle of Bannockburn Experience

The Battle of Bannockburn Experience is a fully Augmented Reality experience created by Bright White Limited for the National Trust.

DSC_0120.JPG

 

The problem faced by the National Trust was how do you make a battle come to life when the site, before the experience was added, was essentially a flat field. How do you make the experience tangible? This is where the Battle of Bannockburn Experience was born.

Continue reading

AR and VR- talking about the differences

This video, perhaps a little long, is an interesting chat to a couple of developers of the company ARTIFACT based in York. This video presents some interesting views about the differences between AR and VR. But also at the rate at which this kind of technology is improving.

I feel this kind of video, and indeed company, shows the rate at which this kind of technology is improving and the thought processes needed in order to maintain relevance in this field.

Let me know what you think. As always, I’ll look forward to hearing your input.

Samsung Galaxy VR

Now, I’ve talked briefly about the Samsung Gear VR before in a previous post (‘Not strictly AR gear’). But, I sumbled across this video which I think gives a better perspective of how this type of technology does function in the real world.

The video shows how the Samsung Gear VR could be used in everyday situations and highlights some interesting points such as the vulnerability that it puts the user in. I mean, if I was playing with this on a train platform I think I would be scared of having my bag snatched or just missing the train because I wasn’t aware of it arriving. It would be like reading a book but way more extreme.

Continue reading

Not strictly AR gear

This isn’t strictly AR but it is very closely linked in the VR (Virtual Reality) community. This is the year that Virtual Reality headgear is going to be available in peoples homes (if you have about £500 spare…but, you get the point). It is no longer an abstract concept that you just see in The Sims but something that, very soon, you could own and experience in your own house.

Continue reading